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ECONOMICS AND ESOTERICA FOR A NEW PARADIGM

The Comte de St. Germain

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Sanctus Germanus, the Comte de St. Germain
From: http://www.sanctusgermanus.net/ 

SANCTUS GERMANUS (Holy Brother) is the Western Latin name for an Ascended Being whose Tibetan origins as a High Lama are only just being made known. The Planetary Logos, Sanat Kumara, gave this Lama the name of Sanctus Germanus as he took on more and more western incarnations, one of which was as the mysterious Comte de St. Germain. It has remained his favorite name. In deference to this preference, we shall use the name Sanctus Germanus or St. Germain interchangeably throughout this website.

Sanctus Germanus’ guru is the Planetary Logos who millions of years ago, came to earth with seven other beings, including the Archangel Michael and the Goddess Kwan Yin, to set up the earthly experiment. The Planetary Logos has remained as an ever present “brothers keeper” throughout the downward cycle of earth, serving as teacher and guru to other Great and Holy Masters as Kuthumi, Morya, the mysterious K-17, and Jesus. He is also known as the Manu of the Seventh Root Race, an advanced racial stock that will eventually people the New Age.

In the 1950’s Sanctus Germanus assumed the position of Hierarch of the New Age. As Hierarch, Sanctus Germanus will direct earth’s affairs for the next two thousand years.

Sanctus Germanus is to prepare the earth for the coming of a new Avatar, the new World Teacher, who will be under the responsibility of the Lord Kuthumi. The exact shape and form of the new Avatar is just emerging in a flood of new ideas and concepts onto the earth plane. It is conceivable that the new Avatar could take the form of a reformed worldwide media: the Internet and all its possibilities, radio, and television rather than of a person. This is yet to be revealed.

Nevertheless, a new era, a new Golden Age, will be ushered in based on these teachings, and the project of Soul Liberation, so dear to Sanctus Germanus, will be implemented so that mankind can achieve its ascension by the end of the two-thousand year period.

But before this can happen, the Great and Holy Master Sanctus Germanus-Eolia will make his presence more and more obvious to mankind as He leads us through a period of upheaval and conflict to banish all vestiges of the dark forces from earth. As the “old” makes way for the “new” and the slate is wiped clean, the roots of the new teachings will start to bear fruit.

Past Lives of One Who Evolved on the Earth Plane

Each one of us here on earth today represents a different stage of spiritual evolution that will eventually lead to our Ascension, a point at which our souls will no longer be required to incarnate on earth to further our evolution. Just as Sanctus Germanus incarnated countless times before he ascended, each of us will have a chance to follow His or other Ascended Masters’ examples.

We see below how the Great and Holy Master Sanctus Germanus helped to shape the course of mankind’s history since the demise of the civilization known as Atlantis. Throughout the thousands of years of reincarnations we can observe two major themes: 1) the nurturing of Truth of the Ancient Wisdom from the child Jesus to the founding of the secret mystery societies that have endured until today and 2) the liberalization of secular political thought over the centuries that has slowly freed mankind from the tyranny of authority and laid the foundations for future soul liberation. 

King of the Golden Age in the Sahara

Sanctus Germanus revealed to Geoffrey Ballard, the founder of the I AM movement, the akashic records of a Golden Age civilization that existed about seventy thousand years ago in the Sahara Desert . In this civilization, Sanctus Germanus ruled as King over a Fourth Root-Race population that had emigrated from Atlantis. His reign was complemented by a Council of enlightened beings who brought about this Golden Age of Peace and Tranquility. In the midst of his reign, the people became more and more obsessed with material and sensual matters, which in their way caused conflict and the scattering of a once cohesive and peaceful civilization. At one point he decided that his people would have to create their own salvation from their ways. He retired into the etheric dimension from where he could influence but not directly rule the people.

Another prince, who took over Sanctus Germanus’ rule, drove the civilization into ruin and within a two thousand year period, the fertile fields and rivers of the Golden Age civilization had been reduced to desert sand.

Joseph, The Father and Protector of the Child Jesus

We see the reappearance of Sanctus Germanus as the Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus, many eons later at the start of the Piscean dispensation. 
When Mary reached the age of womanhood she was betrothed to Joseph, son of Jacob, and a carpenter of Nazareth. Joseph was an upright man and a devoted Essene. Mary told him all the words that the Angel Gabriel had spoken to her, and they rejoiced, for they believed that he, the man of God, had spoken words of truth. And when the time was nearly due for Jesus to be born, and Mary longed to see Elizabeth, the wife of Zechariahs and mother of the future John the Baptist, so Joseph took her in the direction of the Judean hills. They arrived at Bethlehem at nightfall and decided to spend the night but Bethlehem was thronged with people going to Jerusalem ; the inns and homes were filled with guests. Joseph could find no place to rest but in a cave where animals were kept; and there he took Mary to spend the night.

At midnight came a cry, “A child is born in yonder cave among the beasts.” And lo, the promised son of man was born. Now, when the morning came, Joseph sought out a shepherdess whose home was near, and they prepared a room for Mary and the child. They stayed there many days. 

In the meantime, Joseph sent a messenger to Zechariahs and Elizabeth saying, “The child is born in Bethlehem.” Zechariahs and Elizabeth took John and headed immediately to Bethlehem with words of cheer.

According to Jewish custom, the child was circumcised. And when the temple elders asked, “What will you call the child?” Mary said, “His name is Jesus, as the man of God declared.” 
Beyond the river Euphrates lived the Magians. They were wise, could read the language of the stars, and they divined that a master soul had been born. They could see his star above Jerusalem. 
Among the Magian priests, there were three who longed to see the Master of the coming age. They took costly gifts and headed west in search of the child, the newborn king, that they might honor him. One took gold, the symbol of nobility; another myrrh, the symbol of dominion and of power; and the third, gum, the symbol of the wisdom of the sage.

When the Magians reached Jerusalem the people were amazed, and wondered who they were and why they had come. And when they asked, “Where is the child that has been born a king?” the very throne of Herod seemed to shake. King Herod then sent a courtier to bring the traveling Magians back to his court where he queried them “Where is the newborn king?” And then they said,” While yet beyond the Euphrates we saw his star arise, and we have come to honor him.” 
And Herod blanched with fear thinking, “Perhaps, the priests were plotting to restore the kingdom of the Jews!” He wanted to know more about this child that has been born a “King”. Then Herod called the Magian priests again and said, “Go search, and if you find the child that has been born a king, return and tell me all, that I may go and honor him.”

The Magians went their way and found the child with Mary in the shepherd’s home. They honored him; bestowed upon him precious gifts and gave him gold, gum-thus and myrrh. Yet these Magian priests could read the hearts of men; they read the wickedness of Herod’s heart, and knew that he had sworn to kill the newborn king. And so they told the secret to Joseph and Mary and advised them to flee beyond the reach of harm.

Then the priests returned homeward skirting Jerusalem. Well warned, Joseph took the infant Jesus and Mary in the dead of night and fled to Egypt, where they lived with Elihu and Salome in ancient Zoan for a few years. 

When Herod found out the Magians had bypassed him in Jerusalem. he declared that all baby boys should be killed. Elizabeth fled with John to the Judean hills but her husband Zechariahs was slain by Herod’s men. 

It was during this time in exile with Elihu and Salome in Zoan that the infant Jesus grew up learning the secrets and mysteries of the Ancient Wisdom. Elihu and Salome taught him about the Zorasterism, the mystery schools of Egypt, and Buddhism in India.

These teachings would provide him the impetus later on to travel by foot to Persia, India and Tibet to study under the Masters of Wisdoms. He would return to Palestine imbued with these teachings and prepared for the World Teacher, the Lord Maitreya, to overshadow him during the last three years of his life on earth. When it was again safe, Joseph secretly conducted his family back to Nazareth. By the time Jesus was ten, he was already sitting with the temple elders and teaching them. When Jesus reached the age of twelve, Joseph realized that it was time to release him into the hands of the sages and elders of the Jewish religion for more training.

He also took charge of John, son of Elizabeth, after Zechariahs had been slain by Herod’s men. He saw to it that John was inducted into the Essene sect. John, overshadowed by the spirit of Elijah, became the forerunner, the harbinger, to Jesus’ mission on earth and in the process, was beheaded by Herod.

So it was that Sanctus Germanus’ incarnation as Joseph was to assure that the child Jesus was protected from the dangers posed by the political rulers of the times and to see to it that he was properly instructed in the ways of the Ancient Wisdom.

Sanctus Germanus: Founder of the Rosicrucian, Mason, and Knights of Columbus Movements

It is said that the Master reincarnated at least once per century since his “favorite” incarnation as Joseph. As the Christian Church merged its interest with that of the Roman Emperor’s in the third century, the true mystical teachings that were part of the Christianity such as reincarnation, the link between Jesus’ teachings and that of the Brahmins of India, etc. became distorted and detached from their source. It is at this stage that we see the Master Sanctus Germanus step in to try to preserve the original teachings of Jesus in the secret societies.

According to the Master Morya, Sanctus Germanus is the true inner Sovereign Grand Master of both the Masonry and the Knights of Columbus. In one of his incarnations, he lost his life defending the teachings of the Ancient Wisdom. He was born as Albanus into a Roman family in the town of Verulam , England . Albanus returned to Rome where he became a Mason then journeyed back to Verulam and became active in public affairs. Yet by order of the Emperor in 303 AD, Albanus was subsequently beheaded along with other Masons and heretics.

Shrouded in their own self-imposed mysteries today, the Rosicrucians, Masons, and Knights of Columbus all admit to a chief role played by Sanctus Germanus in their rites and ceremonies.

Sanctus Germanus as Merlin, Spiritual Advisor to King Arthur, circa 600AD

In Sanctus Germanus’ incarnation as Merlin, the spiritual advisor to King Arthur (El Morya), we see the first seeds being sown for just human governance, a step in the direction of Soul Liberation of mankind, a theme that would characterize his subsequent incarnations over the centuries until today.

Information about Merlin’s life varies widely from story to story in the body of Arthurian legend. In one version, he is conceived when his father, an incubus (male demon), lies with his mother, a nun at Carmarthen in southwestern Wales , while she is asleep. Some early tales portray Merlin as a warrior who goes insane after a battle, gains the gift of prophecy, and flees to spend his life in the Caledonian Forest in Scotland. Later versions of Arthurian legend present Merlin as an aged magician whose life is marked by marvelous deeds and experiences.

According to tradition, Merlin arranged for the conception of Arthur when King Uther Pendragon of Britain fell in love with Ygraine, a married woman. For transforming King Uther into the likeness of Ygraine’s husband so that she would willingly lie with him, Merlin asked for their child in return. When Ygraine gave birth to Arthur, a child of royal blood, the Master Morya took that incarnation.

Merlin took the child Arthur to a man named Hector to be raised as a commoner. After King Uther died, Merlin notified the barons of Britain that God had established a test to determine the successor to Uther’s throne. In front of a cathedral appeared a large stone topped with an anvil, in which a sword was embedded. Only the rightful king would be able to withdraw the sword. And of course, only Arthur was able to withdraw it, and he became king.

As spiritual advisor to King Arthur, Sanctus Germanus as Merlin, inspired the king to institute the first modifications to the feudal system of governance. This was the famous Knights of the Round Table, where feudal princes occupied seats around a table all being considered equal in power. It was through this radical system of governance that King Arthur’s realm, England , enjoyed a brief period of unprecedented peace and prosperity, “that one brief moment known as Camelot”.

Under Merlin’s advice, the first principles of the rule of law rather than of the sword began to emerge and upon King Arthur’s insistence, a judicial court system was instituted whereby law rather than fiat became the criterion for judgment and solid observable proof had to be presented in order to condemn a man for a crime.

Sanctus Germanus as Roger Bacon (1211-1294) Sowing the Seeds of Liberal Thinking

Sanctus Germanus’ emergence as the English scholastic philosopher and scientist and one of the most influential teachers of the 13th century would add another theme to his quest for soul liberation: that of logical, objective thinking. 

Born in Ilchester, Somersetshire, Bacon was educated at the universities of Oxford and Paris. He remained in Paris after completing his studies to teach at the University of Paris. When he returned to England in about 1251, he entered the religious order of the Franciscans and settled at Oxford. He carried on active studies and did experimental research, mainly in alchemy, optics, and astronomy.

Bacon was critical of the methods of learning of the times, and in the late 1260’s, at the request of Pope Clement IV, he wrote his Opus Majus (Major Work). In this work he represented the necessity of a reformation in the sciences through different methods of studying languages and nature. The Opus Majus was an encyclopedia of all science, embracing grammar and logic, mathematics, physics, experimental research, and moral philosophy. The response of the pope to Bacon’s masterpiece is not known, but the work could not have had much effect during Bacon’s time, because it reached Clement during the period of his fatal illness. The Franciscans condemned Bacon’s revolutionary ideas about the study of science as heretical. In 1278 the general of the Franciscan order, Girolamo Masci, later Pope Nicholas IV, forbade the reading of Bacon’s books and had Bacon arrested. After ten years in prison, Bacon returned to Oxford. He wrote Compendium Studii Theologiae (A Compendium of the Study of Theology, 1292) shortly before his death.

Despite his advanced knowledge, Bacon accepted some of the popular but later disproved beliefs of his time, such as the existence of a philosopher’s stone and the efficacy of astrology. Although many inventions have been credited to him, some of them undoubtedly were derived from the study of Arab scientists.
His writings brought new and ingenious views on optics, particularly on refraction; on the apparent magnitude of objects; and on the apparent increase in the size of the sun and moon at the horizon. He found that with sulfur, saltpeter, and charcoal, a substance (now known as gunpowder) could be produced that would imitate lightning and cause explosions. The previous use of gunpowder by the Arabs, however, has since been shown.

Bacon considered mathematics, together with experimentation, the only means of arriving at a knowledge of nature. He studied several languages and wrote Latin with great elegance and clarity. Because of his extensive knowledge he was known as Doctor Admirabilis. Six of his works were printed between 1485 and 1614, and in 1733 the Opus Majus was edited and published.

Sanctus Germanus as Christian Rosenkrantz, 14th Century: Keeping the Ancient Wisdom alive

Charles W. Leadbeater, the renowned theosophist, says that Sanctus Germanus incarnated as Christian Rosenkrantz, a monk interested in occult studies and said to be the founder of the Invisible Order of Rosicrucianism in Germany. We know little of his work but in his later incarnation as the mysterious Count of St. Germain, Sanctus Germanus is known to have a cipher Rosicrucian manuscript bearing the secret codes of the symbolism used in the Rosicrucian movement. Whether he was or was not Christian Rosenkrantz, we note the continued trend in the reincarnations of the Master: the preservation of the mysteries of the Ancient Wisdom.

Sanctus Germanus as Christopher Columbus (1451-1506)

Sanctus Germanus as the Italian-Spanish navigator Christopher Columbus was both well versed in theology as well as maritime studies. His personal aim was to a westward route to Asia. He first tried to convince the crown in Portugal to support a westward trip over the Atlantic but failed. He then moved to Spain where after many difficulties, convinced the Catholic monarchs, Isabel and Fernando, to support his project.

His voyage of 1492 failed to land him in Asia. Instead, he had discovered the New World which made him famous throughout Europe. He managed to secure for himself the title of Admiral, and more royal patronage poured in. He made two more voyages to the New World after being named the Viceroy of his discovered lands and after extracting an agreement from the King and Queen to receive ten percent of all wealth brought back. However, his fame within a decade became tarnished with charges of corruption in his administration of the new territories. Thereafter he was banned from further movement and died in political obscurity.

Sanctus Germanus himself has admitted that during this incarnation, he easily succumbed to personal greed and avarice, however, this does not obscure the fact that through his endeavour, he is credited with opening the New World to the rest of humanity.

Sanctus Germanus as Francis Bacon of England (1561-1626): The Planting of Ideas

As the First Baron Verulam and Viscount Saint Albans, English philosopher and statesman, Francis Bacon, became one of the pioneers of modern scientific thought. Following along the lines of his previous incarnation as Roger Bacon, Sanctus Germanus again revolutionized mankind’s thinking by introducing ampliative inductive reasoning to the formation of scientific hypotheses, contributing to the fundamental advancement of the scientific method. His work on “cleaning” facts of prejudice and preconceived notions added much empiricist thinking and logic.

As a holder of high office throughout most of his life, he was able to obscure his active involvement in the secret societies of the Ancient Wisdom. Such activities undoubtedly contributed to his incisive thinking that advanced scientific thinking.

Sanctus Germanus was born as Francis Bacon on January 22, 1561, at York House, in the Strand, London, and educated at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Elected to the House of Commons in 1584, he served until 1614. He wrote letters of sound advice to Elizabeth I, Queen of England, but his suggestions were never implemented, and he completely lost favor with the queen in 1593, when he opposed a bill for a royal subsidy. He regained the respect of the court, however, with the accession of James I to the English throne in 1603.

Bacon proposed schemes for the union of England and Scotland and recommended measures for dealing with Roman Catholics. For these efforts he was knighted on July 23, 1603, was made a commissioner for the union of Scotland and England, and was given a pension in 1604. His Advancement of Learning was published and presented to the king in 1605. Two years later he was appointed solicitor general.

In the last session of the first Parliament held (February 1611) under James I, the differences between Crown and Commons grew critical, and Bacon took the role of mediator, despite his distrust of James’s chief minister, Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury. On Salisbury ‘s death in 1612, Bacon wrote several papers on statecraft, particularly on relations between Crown and Commons, in order to gain the king’s attention. In 1613 he was appointed attorney general.

In 1616 Bacon became a privy councilor, and in 1618 he was appointed Lord Chancellor and raised to the peerage as Baron Verulam. In 1620 his Novum Organum was published, and on January 26, 1621, he was created Viscount Saint Albans. In the same year he was charged by Parliament with accepting bribes. He confessed but said that he was “heartily and penitently sorry.” He submitted himself to the will of his fellow peers, who ordered him fined, imprisoned during the king’s pleasure, and banished from Parliament and the court.

After his release, he retired to his family residence at Gorhambury. In September 1621 the king pardoned him but prohibited his return to Parliament or the court. Bacon then resumed his writing, completing his History of Henry VII and his Latin translation of The Advancement of Learning (De Augmentis). In March 1622 he offered to make a digest of the laws, with no further consequence despite repeated petitions to James I and James’s successor, Charles I. He died in London on April 9, 1626.

Bacon’s writings fall into three categories: philosophical, purely literary, and professional. The best of his philosophical works are The Advancement of Learning (1605), a review in English of the state of knowledge in his own time, and Novum Organum ; or, Indications Respecting the Interpretation of Nature (1620) .

Bacon’s philosophy emphasized the belief that people are the servants and interpreters of nature, that truth is not derived from authority, and that knowledge is the fruit of experience. This philosophy would in part sow the seeds of revolution in the following century.

Bacon is generally credited with having contributed to logic through the method known as ampliative inference, a technique of inductive reasoning. Previous logicians had practiced induction by simple enumeration, that is, drawing general conclusions from particular data. Bacon’s method was to infer by use of analogy, from the characteristics or properties of the larger group to which that datum belonged, leaving to later experience the correction of evident errors. Because it added significantly to the improvement of scientific hypotheses, this method was a fundamental advancement of the scientific method.

Bacon’s Novum Organum successfully influenced the acceptance of accurate observation and experimentation in science. In it he maintained that all prejudices and preconceived attitudes, which he called idols, must be abandoned, whether they be the common property of the race due to common modes of thought (“idols of the tribe”), or the peculiar possession of the individual (“idols of the cave”); whether they arise from too great a dependence on language (“idols of the marketplace”), or from tradition (“idols of the theater”). The principles laid down in the Novum Organum had an important influence on the subsequent development of empiricist thought.

Bacon’s Essays, his chief contributions to literature, were published at various times between 1597 and 1625. His History of Henry VII (1622) shows his abilities in scholarly research. In his fanciful New Atlantis Bacon suggested the formation of scientific academies. Bacon’s professional works include Maxims of the Law (1630), Reading on the Statute of Uses (1642), pleadings in law cases, and speeches in Parliament. 

Bacon was part of the period of Enlightenment, a philosophical movement based on the belief that science and human reason can triumph over political and religious tyranny. An intellectual spirit that knew no national boundaries, it drew proponents from America , England , France , Germany , Italy , Scotland , Spain , and Russia.

He is regarded as one three English prophets of the Enlightenment along with John Locke and Sir Isaac Newton. American statesman Thomas Jefferson, a disciple of the Enlightenment, agreed with this assessment, ordering for his library in 1789 a composite portrait of the same three men. They had, he wrote to a friend, laid the foundation for the physical and moral sciences of modernity and were “the three greatest men that have ever lived, without any exception.” 

It is said that Sir Francis had a secret side to life and served as the Imperator of the Rosicrucian Order, which at that time was a highly secretive organization. He may also have been a leader of the Masons. Sanctus Germanus was to be intimately involved in both earth-shaking revolutions, as we shall see in his next incarnations.

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Sanctus Germanus as Le Comte de St. Germain

ONE of the most mysterious characters in modern history is the famous Comte de St. Germain, described by his friend Prince Karl von Hesse as “one of the greatest philosophers who ever lived, the friend of humanity, whose heart was concerned only with the happiness of others.” Intimate and counselor of Kings and Princes, nemesis of deceptive ministers, Rosicrucian, Mason, accredited Messenger of the Masters of Wisdom – the Comte de St. Germain worked in Europe for more than a century, faithfully performing the difficult task which had been entrusted to him. 
The amazing and inscrutable personality in which the Adept known as St. Germain clothed himself was the outstanding topic of conversation among the nobility of the eighteenth century. During the 112 years that he is said to have lived in Europe , he always presented the appearance of a man about forty-five years of age. He was of medium height, with a slender, graceful figure, a captivating smile, and eyes of peculiar beauty. “Oh, what eyes!” sighed the Countess d’Adhémar. “I have never seen their equal!”

He was an extraordinary linguist, speaking French, German, English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian and Swedish without the slightest trace of an accent, and his knowledge of Sanscrit, Chinese and Arabic showed that he was well acquainted with the East. His proficiency in music was equally remarkable. As a violinist he is said to have rivalled Paganini, while his performances on the harpsichord called forth enthusiastic applause from Frederick the Great. His ability to improvise made a great impression on Rameau, who met him in Venice in 1710. St. Germain was also a composer. One of his musical compositions was given to Tchaikowsky, Prince Ferdinand von Lobkowitz inherited a second, while two others, bearing the dates 1745 and 1760, are the property of the British Museum .

The Comte de St. Germain was also a painter of rare ability, famed for his power to reproduce the original brilliance of precious stones on canvas. Although he refused to betray his secret, it was commonly supposed that he produced the effect by mixing powdered mother-of-pearl with his pigments. He was highly esteemed as an art critic and was frequently consulted in regard to the authenticity of paintings. The prodigious memory of the Comte de St. Germain was a constant source of amazement to his friends. He would merely glance at a paper, and days afterward repeat its contents without missing a word. He was ambidextrous, and could write a poem with one hand while he framed a diplomatic paper with the other. He frequently read sealed letters without touching them and was known to answer questions before they had been put into words. Many of St. Germain’s friends had practical proof of his alchemical knowledge. Casanova relates that one day while visiting St. Germain in his laboratory, the latter asked for a silver coin. In a few moments it was returned to Casanova as pure gold. St. Germain also possessed the secret of melting several small diamonds into one large stone, an art learned in India, he said. While visiting the French Ambassador to The Hague, he broke up a superb diamond of his own manufacture, the duplicate of which he had recently sold for 5500 louis d’or. On another occasion he removed a flaw from a diamond belonging to Louis XV, increasing the value of the stone by 4000 livres. On gala occasions he appeared with a diamond ring on every finger and with shoe-buckles estimated to be worth at least 200,000 francs.

The charming personality of the Comte de St. Germain made him a welcome guest in the homes of the nobility of every land. But while he often sat at table with his friends, his own food was specially prepared for him in his own apartments. He ate no meat and drank no wine, his favorite beverage being a tea which he prepared from certain herbs, and which he frequently presented to his friends. His extraordinary popularity was due to his prowess as a raconteur, to his well-known intimacy with the greatest men and women of the day, to his familiarity with occult subjects, and especially to the mystery of his birth and nationality, which he consistently refused to reveal. He spoke with feeling of things which had happened hundreds of years in the past, giving the impression that he himself had been present. One evening, while he was recounting an event which had happened many centuries before, he turned to his butler and asked if any important details had been omitted. “Monsieur le Comte forgets,” his butler replied, “that I have been with him only five hundred years. I could not, therefore, have been present at that occurrence. It must have been my predecessor.”

If, as many claimed, St. Germain affirmed that he had lived in Chaldea and possessed the secrets of the Egyptian sages, he may have spoken the truth without making any miraculous claim. There are Initiates, and not necessarily of the highest, who are able to recall many of their past lives. This may have been St. Germain’s way of calling his friends’ attention to the doctrine of reincarnation. Or perhaps he knew the secret of “the Elixir of Life.” 

Although no one knew when the Comte de St. Germain was born, his life from 1710 to 1822 is a matter of history. Both Rameau and the Countess de Georgy met him in Venice in 1710.

Fifty years later the aged Countess met him in Madame Pompadour’s house and asked him if his father had been in Venice in that year. “No, Madame,” the Count replied, “but I myself was living in Venice at the end of the last and the beginning of this century. I had the honor to pay you court then, and you were kind enough to admire a little Barcarolle of my composing.” The Countess could not believe her ears. “But if that is true,” she gasped, “you must be at least a hundred years old!” The Count smiled. “That, Madame, is not impossible!”

In 1723 the Count showed his mother’s portrait, which he always wore on his arm, to the mother of the future Countess de Genlis. It was a miniature of an exceptionally beautiful woman, dressed in a costume unfamiliar to the Countess. “To what period does this costume belong?” the Countess inquired. The Count merely smiled and changed the subject.

From 1737 to 1742 the Comte de St. Germain was living in the Court of the Shah of Persia, occupied with alchemical research. On his return from Persia he settled in Versailles and became an intimate friend of Louis XV and Madame Pompadour. In the following year he was caught in the Jacobite Revolution in England. From there he went to Vienna , and afterward visited Frederick the Great in his castle of Sans-Souci in Potsdam , where Voltaire was also an honored guest. Although Voltaire was opposed to St. Germain’s fellow-Theosophist Saint-Martin, his admiration for St. Germain was unbounded. In a letter to Frederick , Voltaire expressed his opinion that “the Comte de St. Germain is a man who was never born, who will never die, and who knows everything.”

In 1755 the Comte de St. Germain accompanied General Clive to India. On his return to France Louis XV gave him a suite of apartments in the Royal Chateau of Chambord, in Touraine. Here he often entertained the King and members of the Court in the alchemical laboratory which the King had provided for him. 

In 1760 Louis sent the Comte de St. Germain on a delicate diplomatic mission to The Hague and London.

At that time he discovered that the Duc de Choiseul, who up to that time had been implicitly trusted by the King, was playing a double game. Although St. Germain confided this fact to the King, the former was determined that the Peace Treaty between England and France should be signed, no matter who received the credit. So one evening in May, 1761, St. Germain called upon the Duc de Choiseul and remained closeted with him the whole night. This conference resulted in the celebrated alliance known as the Family Compact. This in its turn was the forerunner of the Treaty of Paris, which brought the colonial war between England and France to a close. 

In the following year St. Germain was called to St. Petersburg, where he played an important part in the revolution which placed Catherine the Great upon the throne of Russia. He left the country in the uniform of a Russian general, with full credentials to which the imperial seal of Russia was affixed. Shortly afterward he appeared in Tunis and Leghorn while the Russian fleet was there, again in Russian uniform, and known under the name of Graf Saltikoff. 

After the death of Louis XV in 1774, St. Germain spent several years travelling in Germany and Austria. Among the Kings, Princes, Ambassadors and scholars who met him during those years, how many suspected that the soul of a great Adept looked out through the eyes of the Comte de St. Germain? How many realized that they were conversing with an emissary of that Great Fraternity of Perfected Men who stand behind the scenes of all the great world-dramas, one who was directing not only the minor currents of European history, but some of the major currents as well? How many were aware of St. Germain’s real mission, part of which was the introduction of Theosophical principles into the various occult fraternities of the day? 
The Rosicrucian organizations were certainly helped by him. While Christian Rosencreuz, the founder of the Order, transmitted his teachings orally, St. Germain recorded the doctrines in figures, and one of his enciphered manuscripts became the property of his staunch friend, Prince Karl von Hesse. H.P.B. mentions this manuscript in The Secret Doctrine (II, 202) and quotes at length from another (II, 582). While St. Germain was living in Vienna he spent much of his time in the Rosicrucian laboratory on the Landstrasse, and at one time lived in the room which Leibniz occupied in 1713. St. Germain also worked with the Fratres Lucis, and with the “Knights and Brothers of Asia” who studied Rosicrucian and Hermetic science and made the “philosopher’s stone”(1) one of the objects of their research.

Although an effort has been made to eliminate St. Germain’s name from modern Masonic literature, careful research into Masonic archives will prove that he occupied a prominent position in eighteenth century Masonry. He acted as a delegate to the Wilhelmsbad Convention in 1782 and to the great Paris Convention of 1785. Cadet de Gassicourt described him as a travelling member of the Knights Templar, and Deschamps says that Cagliostro was initiated into that Order by St. Germain. The Comte de St. Germain is said to have died on February 27, 1784, and the Church Register of Eckernförde in Danish Holstein contains the record of his death and burial. But as it happens, some of St. Germain’s most important work was done after that date. This fact is brought out in the Souvenirs de Marie-Antoinette, written by one of her ladies-in-waiting, the Countess d’Adhémar. This diary was started in 1760 and ended in 1821, one year before the death of the Countess, and a large part of it is concerned with St. Germain’s efforts to avert the horrors of the French Revolution. 

Early one Sunday morning in 1788 the Countess was surprised to receive a visit from the Comte de St. Germain, whom she had not seen in several years. He warned her that a giant conspiracy was under foot, in which the Encyclopaedists would use the Duc de Chartres in an effort to overthrow the monarchy, and asked her to take him to the Queen. When Madame d’Adhémar reported the conversation to Marie-Antoinette, the Queen confessed that she also had received another communication from this mysterious stranger who had protected her with warnings from the day of her arrival in France. On the following day St. Germain was admitted into the private apartments of the Queen. “Madame,” he said to her, “for twenty years I was on intimate terms with the late King, who deigned to listen to me with kindness. He made use of my poor abilities on several occasions, and I do not think he regretted giving me his confidence.”

After warning her of the serious condition of France, he asked her to communicate his message to the King and to request the King not to consult with Maurepas. But the King ignored the warning, and went directly to Maurepas, who immediately called upon Madame d’Adhémar. In the midst of the conversation St. Germain appeared. He confronted Maurepas with his treachery and said to him: “In opposing yourself to my seeing the monarch, you are losing the monarchy, for I have but a limited time to give to France. This time over, I shall not be seen here again, until after three successive generations have gone down to the grave,”

The second warning from St. Germain came on July 14, 1789, when the Queen was saying farewell to the Duchesse de Polignac. She opened the letter and read: “My words have fallen on your ears in vain, and you have reached the period of which I informed you. All the Polignacs and their friends are doomed to death. The Comte d’Artois will perish.” 

His farewell letter, addressed to Madame d’Adhémar, arrived on October 5, 1789. “All is lost, Countess!” he wrote. “This sun is the last which will set on the monarchy. Tomorrow it will exist no more. My advice has been scorned. Now it is too late.” In that letter he asked the Countess to meet him early the next morning. In that conversation the Comte de St. Germain informed her that the time when he could have helped France was past. “I can do nothing now. My hands are tied by one stronger than myself. The hour of repose is past, and the decrees of Providence must be fulfilled.” He foretold the death of the Queen, the complete ruin of the Bourbons, the rise of Napoleon. “And you yourself?” the Countess asked. “I must go to Sweden,” he answered. “A great crime is brewing there, and I am going to try to prevent it. His Majesty Gustavus III interests me. He is worth more than his renown.” The Countess inquired if she would see him again. “Five times more,” he answered. “Do not wish for the sixth.”

True to his word, the Comte de St. Germain appeared to the Countess d’Adhémar on five different occasions: at the beheading of the Queen; on the 18th Brumaire; the day following the death of the Duc d’Enghien in 1804; in January, 1813; on the eve of the assassination of the Duc de Berri in 1820. Presumably, the sixth time was on the day of her death, in 1822. What happened to the Comte de St. Germain after that date? Did he, as Andrew Lang asks, “die in the palace of Prince Karl von Hesse about 1780-85? Did he, on the other hand, escape from the French prison where Grosley thought he saw him, during the French Revolution? Was he known to Lord Lytton about 1860? Who knows?” Who, indeed.

One of the Masters spoke of the “benevolent German Prince from whose house, and in whose presence he (St. Germain) made his last exit – home.” 

In the last decade of the eighteenth century St. Germain confided his future plans to his Austrian friend, Franz Graeffer, saying, “Tomorrow night I am off. I am much needed in Constantinople, then in England, there to prepare two new inventions which you will have in the next century: trains and steamboats. Toward the end of this century I shall disappear out of Europe, and betake myself to the region of the Himalayas . I will rest; I must rest. Exactly in 85 years will people again set eyes on me. Farewell.” (Kleine Wiener Memorien.)

These words were spoken in 1790. Eighty-five years from that date brings us to 1875. What part did St. Germain play in the Theosophical Movement of the last century? What part is he going to play in the present century? H.P.B. gave a cryptic suggestion of the time when he would again appear: 
The Comte de St. Germain was certainly the greatest Oriental Adept Europe had seen during the last centuries. But Europe knew him not. Perchance some may recognize him at the next Terreur, which will affect all Europe when it comes, and not one country alone. Was the event of which she spoke the last great War, or does the real Terreur still lie before us?

(From “Count of St. Germain” from a series, Great Theosophists, Theosophy, Vol. 27, No. 1, November, 1938 , Number 28 of a 29-part series)

The Comte de St. Germain stepped into a Europe full of discord and conflict. Austria and France were pitted against England and Prussia . Russia was stirring up strife in Poland and England , in addition to warring with France , was also at war with her colonies in America and trying to conquer India . The constant state of war and conflict between the ruling families drew resources away from their respective populations keeping the masses in a state of abject poverty, while the Royalty continued to wine, dine, and scheme on their political alliances. 

It was obvious to the European Royalty that the Comte de St. Germain was of high birth, for he exhibited the savoir-faire and mannerisms of the Court and an extremely high intellectual acumen in most fields of endeavor. But what was all this flamboyance and phenomena about? Could the Great Brotherhood of Light have hoped that the powers that controlled 18th Century Europe would stop battling each other and listen to the advice of one so endowed and extraordinary?

The Comte de St. Germain made a decision to work alongside King Louis XV, for the King preferred to use secret diplomacy in his matters of foreign affairs. The Comte de St. Germain also hoped he could bring the warring parties into a federated Europe that would exist in peace. But as an ascended Master he could but advise, for under the Cosmic Law he was bound to respect the free will of those involved. He could but hope that his extraordinary feats demonstrated before their very eyes would add more validity to his words of counsel.

As an ascended Master, the Comte de St. Germain could clearly see the future fate of the royalty if they continued on their path of arrogance and war. He laid out these dangers to the powers that be, including the famous Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France. But his visions of the future fell on deaf ears. The King’s ministers feeling usurped by the Count plotted to eliminate him rather than take his warnings into consideration. Instead internecine court plotting took precedence over the looming events. Finally, their arrogant blindness led them into direct confrontation with the masses in the French Revolution.

A decade before, the Comte de St. Germain took time off in Europe to externalize as a gentleman in the back of the room at the Philadelphia State House when the Declaration of Independence was before the body of colonial leaders for signing. When the colonial leaders hesitated, thinking of the war and deaths that would ensue in a war with England, the gentleman stood up and admonished in a loud voice, “Sign this Parchment!” The Declaration of Independence would create America, an actual place on earth where ideas promoting man’s liberation could be implemented. Sanctus Germanus would nurture this creation just as he did as Joseph, the father of the child Jesus.

Back in Europe, Sanctus Germanus could not use his powers to strike back at those who sought to kill him. And indeed plot after plot to incarcerate or kill him followed him. No, as an ascended Master, that due his enemies would have to be left to the Laws of Karma. Instead, he merely disappeared, often retreating to the Brotherhood’s sanctuaries in the mountains of Europe or Asia for meditation and renewal, and then reappeared at key moments when it was safe.

Both the American and the French Revolutions came about in part from the liberal ideals advanced during the Age of Enlightenment of which Sanctus Germanus was an integral part in his incarnation as Sir Francis Bacon. The revolutionary ideas that swept over the European continent following the fall of the French monarchy would level the influences of the royal courts forever.

Sanctus Germanus played an active “behind the scenes” role in the realization of the idea of America. It is said that he inspired Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, standing firmly behind the emancipation of America’s slaves. More is not known about his role in the birth pains of America. 

We can see that the various incarnations of Sanctus Germanus from Merlin to the Comte de St. Germain dealt with creating the governing and social context for the liberation of mankind from tyrannical authority and poverty. Again the Great Brotherhood of Light demonstrated that it is the inevitable power of the word, those thought-forms designed to free man’s soul that would triumph over the most powerful of kings.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, Sanctus Germanus would turn his attention to the more difficult and arduous process of soul liberation.

Sanctus Germanus and the Process of Soul Liberation

During the latter part of the 19th Century and throughout the 20th Century, the Great Brotherhood of Light externalized itself with ever more force and frequency in the form of the Theosophy, the “I AM”, Djwal Khul-Alice A. Bailey, Bridge to Freedom and Summit Lighthouse Movements. All these movements would have in common the message of Soul Liberation.

It was no accident that this first embodiment of the Ancient Wisdom to the west would start in America when Helena P. Blavatsky and Colonel Henry Steele Olcott founded the Theosophical Society in 1875 in New York.

Madame Blavatsky only hints of the role that Sanctus Germanus played in her training and teachings, although one sees him in the precipitated photo in About Us. It would be the Masters Kuthumi and Morya who would take on the major task of forming the Theosophical Movement in America, Great Britain and India. Blavatsky’s seminal works, Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine would revolutionize western thinking and reveal to it the existence of the Great Brotherhood of Light and its hand in moving the course of events throughout history.

Moreover, Theosophy would introduce the notion that man’s true liberation came from the soul within, his Higher Self, and that each individual was indeed the son of God, if not part of God Itself. It revealed to the western world that Christianity had its roots in the Ancient Mystery Schools of Egypt and India and that Jesus had indeed traveled there and received instructions from the Masters of the Great Brotherhood of Light. That the very foundations of Christianity came from the same source as Buddhism and other religions would plant the seeds for the coming World Religion.

Revealed to western thinking what those in the East had known for centuries, was that God was within every man’s body. He would have to look inward, reconnect with his own soul and then allow it to infuse his physical body and express itself. This was soul liberation and the salvation of mankind.

The Theosophical movement would spread throughout the world by the first quarter of the Twentieth Century, then wane, kept alive by the rich research and insights done by the founders and luminaries during its initial stages of development. Today, their publications continue to provide a firm foundation establishing the Ancient Wisdom in the western world. 
The Tibetan Master Djwal Khul stepped in, as internal strife in the Theosophical Movement caused it to lose momentum, and dictated an impressive body of teachings to Alice A. Bailey over a period of forty years. This body of enlightened teachings put in historical and future perspective the ongoing externalization of the Great Brotherhood of Light’s activities and revealed the huge body of Cosmic Laws that governed such activities.

It would not be until the 1930’s that Sanctus Germanus would again materialize and take a direct hand in the formation of the “I AM” movement. As with his appearance as the Comte de St. Germain in the 18th Century in a Europe in tumult, his reappearance in the 1930’s occurred in the midst of the Great Depression and the World Wars 1914 to 1945. As an ascended Master Sanctus Germanus worked through his messenger Mr. Godfrey Ballard and together the “I AM” movement swelled to around 700,000 adherents.

The “I AM” movement carried on the teachings of soul liberation, the God within or the “I AM”. Another thrust of the “I AM” movement was to invoke and preserve the idea of America, a revolutionary experiment in freedom, and to keep it out of the worldwide insanity of war and turmoil that had engulfed the earth. In 1941, Mr. Ballard passed on and the “I AM” movement gradually lost its momentum. The United States of America subsequently joined the warring nations in the Second World War.

In the post-war years of the 1950’s Sanctus Germanus again appeared through his messenger, Geraldine Innocente, to form the Bridge to Freedom movement. Through this rather short-lived movement, Sanctus Germanus revealed more about the structure of the Great Brotherhood of Light, it’s continued governance of world affairs, and laid before mankind its present and future plans to externalize and usher in the New Era.

He again appeared through another messenger, Marc Prophet, and formed the Summit Lighthouse movement in the 1970’s. This movement attempted to formalize the teachings of the ascended Masters into a university curriculum to train disciples and initiates for the Great Brotherhood of Light. But as is often the case, the movement became the target of the dark forces, and misrepresentations from the astral plane bearing look-alikes of the Masters began to skew the teachings of the movement, leaving many disillusioned followers in its wake.

Sanctus Germanus, the Present Hierarch of the New Age

We have seen in the various incarnations of the Great and Holy Master Sanctus Germanus a constant theme of liberating mankind from the clutches of dark thinking and superstition. From the time as Joseph he nurtured the child Jesus and saw to it that he was instructed in the tradition of the Ancient Wisdom. In his subsequent incarnations he continued to keep the ancient mysteries alive in the Rosicrucian and Masons secret societies that survive until this day along with other embodiments of the Ancient Wisdom such as Theosophy. At the same time, from Merlin onward he sought to liberate man’s society from tyrannical authority and raise human thinking and logic, to advance scientific thinking-all this to set the stage for mankind’s soul liberation which we are experiencing today and which we shall see in full bloom in the New Age.

With centuries of experience on earth in various incarnations behind him, the ascended Master Sanctus Germanus has now been given the responsibility as the growing hierarch of the New Age. Here is what Sir Arthur Conan Doyle said of the Master:

The Masters of Wisdom, as you know, play no favorites. If there is a favorite amongst them it is simply that the will of God be done and fulfilled. And the Master St. Germain obviously is no exception to this. And so to him the planet would almost be like a sphere he holds in the palm of his hand. Literally the whole planetary body is subject to his will. He, as it were, takes his place as the growing hierarch of the NEW AGE, Aquarius.

Today his presence is felt everywhere in the world. Unbeknownst to most, Sanctus Germanus has been the inspiration and promoter behind the tremendous explosion of innovations involving the computer and the Internet. Each time you sit down at your computer and log on to the Internet, think of the Great and Holy Master Sanctus Germanus. Through email and the semi-instantaneous access and connection to information all over the world, you are experiencing in a small way, the precursor of the integral “knowingness” of the New Age. Email is right now the crude precursor to mental telepathy, which will be the basis of communication in the advanced stages of the New Age. Of course, the greed that accompanied the dot.com rise and fall had to be flushed out but the technology and potential of broadband connections around the world stand ready to be exploited. It will just be a matter of time before the earth will experience forms of the Internet heretofore inconceivable, and Sanctus Germanus uses this innovation in ever more frequency and power to get his message of soul liberation to mankind.

But before these great promises of soul liberation and peace can be realized on earth, we must pass through yet another period of earthly turmoil. In the year 2000 the Great Cosmic Beings responsible for earth decided to accelerate the pace of earth’s evolution to make up for the various setbacks encountered during the Piscean dispensation. Time will fly, so to speak, but the temporary result will be a world engulfed in insanity.

What will appear to the material eye as a collapse of the financial, economic, and political structures in the world and the rise of terrorism, war, and plain insane behavior worldwide must be interpreted as a grading process, the weeding out of the evil influences on earth, the separation of the tares from the wheat. At the helm of this momentous purging of earth’s dark forces is the Great and Holy Master Sanctus Germanus again appearing at this particular flashpoint as he did in past history to guide and protect us at the threshold of the New Age.

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Comte de St. Germain: A Man Beyond His Time

Many average, reasonable men can conceive wisdom only under the boring form of a sermon and think of the sage only in the semblance of a clergyman. For such men prudery, hypocrisy, and the most abject enslavement to ritual habit and prejudice must be the everyday virtues. When therefore it happens that a genuine sage, by way of amusing himself, mystifies his contemporaries, follows a woman, or lightheartedly raises his glass, he is condemned eternally by the army of short-sighted people whose judgment forms posterity.

That is what happened in the case of the Comte de Saint-Germain. He had a love of jewels in an extreme form, and he ostentatiously showed off those he possessed. He kept a great quantity of them in a casket, which he carried about everywhere with him. The importance he attached to jewels was so great that in the pictures painted by him, which were in themselves remarkable, the figures were covered with jewels; and his colors were so vivid and strange that faces looked pale and insignificant by contrast. Jewels cast their reflection on him and threw a distorting light on the whole of his life.

His contemporaries did not forgive him this weakness. Nor did they forgive him for keeping for an entire century the physical appearance of a man of between forty and fifty years old. Apparently a man cannot be taken seriously if he does not conform strictly to the laws of nature, and he was called a charlatan because he possessed a secret which allowed him to prolong his life beyond known human limits.

His Lifestyle

Saint-Germain seems also to have been free personally from the solemnity in which men of religion and philosophers wrap themselves. He enjoyed and sought the company of the pretty women of his day. Though he never ate any food in public, he liked dining out because of the people he met and the conversation he heard. He was an aristocrat who lived with princes and even with kings almost on a footing of an equal. He gave recipes for removing wrinkles and dyeing hair. He had an immense stock of amusing stories with which he regaled society. It appears from the memoirs of Baron von Gleichen that when Saint-Germain was in Paris he became the lover of Mademoiselle Lambert, daughter of the Chevalier Lambert, who lived in the house in which he lodged. And it appears from Grosley’s memoirs that in Holland he became the lover of a woman as rich and mysterious as himself.

At first sight all this is incompatible with the high mission with which he was invested, with the part he played in the Hermetic societies of Germany and France. But the contradiction is perhaps only apparent. His outward appearance of a man of the world was necessary in the first place for the purposes of the secret diplomacy in which Louis XV often employed him. Moreover, we often have an erroneous conception of the activities of a master. The possession of an “opal of monstrous size, of a white sapphire as big as an egg, of the treasures of Aladdin’s lamp,” is a harmless pleasure if these treasures have been inherited or have been made through the help of miraculous knowledge. It is no great eccentricity in a man to pull down his cuffs in order to show the sparkle of the rubies in his links. And if Mademoiselle Lambert had the ideas of her time on the subject of gallantry, the Comte de Saint-Germain can hardly be reproached for lingering one night in her room in order to open in her presence the mysterious jewel casket and invite her to choose one of those diamonds that were the admiration of Madam de Pompadour.

For pleasure in life drags a man down only when it is carried to excess. It may be that there exists a way by which a man may attain the highest spirituality and yet keep this pleasure. Moreover, on a certain plane, the chain of the senses no longer exists and kisses cease to burn; a man can no longer harm either himself or others by virtue of the power that the transformation has wrought in him.

A Man who never dies

“A man who knows everything and who never dies,” said Voltaire of the Comte de Saint-Germain. He might have added that he was a man whose origin was unknown and who disappeared without leaving a trace. In vain his contemporaries tried to penetrate the mystery, and in vain the chiefs of police and the ministers of the various countries whose inhabitants he puzzled, flattered themselves that they had solved the riddle of his birth.

Louis XV must have known who he was, for he extended to him a friendship that aroused the jealousy of his court. He allotted him rooms in the Chateau of Chambord. He shut himself up with Saint-Germain and Madam de Pompadour for whole evenings; and the pleasure he derived from his conversation and the admiration he no doubt felt for the range of his knowledge cannot explain the consideration, almost the deference, he had for him. Madam du Housset says in her memoirs that the king spoke of Saint-Germain as a personage of illustrious birth. Count Charles of Hesse Cassel, with whom he lived during the last years in which history is able to follow his career, must also have possessed the secret of his birth. He worked at alchemy with him, and Saint-Germain treated him as an equal. It was to him that Saint-Germain entrusted his papers just before his supposed death in 1784. However, neither Louis XV nor the Count of Hesse Cassel ever revealed anything about the birth of Saint-Germain. The count even went so far as invariably to withhold the smallest detail bearing on the life of his mysterious friend. This is a very remarkable fact, since Saint-Germain was an extremely well known figure.

In those days, when the aristocracy immersed itself in the occult sciences, secret societies and magic, this man, who was said to possess the elixir of life and to be able to make gold at will, was the subject of interminable talk. An inner force that is irresistibly strong compels men to talk. It makes no difference whether a man is a king or a count; all alike are subject to this force, and increasingly subject to it in proportion as they spend their time with women. For Louis XV and the count to have held out against the curiosity of beloved mistresses we must presume in them either a strength of mind that they certainly did not possess or else some imperious motive which we cannot determine.

His origins

The commonest hypothesis about his birth is that Saint-Germain was the natural son of the widow of Charles II of Spain and a certain Comte (Count) Adanero, whom she knew at Bayonne. This Spanish queen was Marie de Neubourg, whom Victor Hugo took as the heroine of his Ruy Blas. Those who disliked Saint-Germain said that he was the son of a Portuguese Jew named Aymar, while those who hated him said, in the effort to add to his discredit, that he was the son of an Alsatian Jew named Wolff. Fairly recently a new genealogy of Saint-Germain has been put forward, which seems the most probable of all. It is the work of the theosophists and Annie Besant, who has frequently made the statement that the Comte de Saint-Germain was one of the sons of Francis Racoczi II, Prince of Transylvania. The children of Francis Racoczi were brought up by the Emperor of Austria, but one of them was withdrawn from his guardianship. The story was put about that he was dead, but actually he was given into the charge of the last descendant of the Medici family, who brought him up in Italy. He took the name of Saint-Germain from the little town of San Germano, where he had spent some years during his childhood and where his father had estates. This would give an air of probability to the memories of southern lands and sunny palaces which Saint-Germain liked to call up as the setting of his childhood. And it would help to account for the consideration that Louis XV showed him. The impenetrable silence kept by him and by those to whom he entrusted his secret would in this event be due to fear of the Emperor of Austria and possible vengeance on his part. The belief that Saint-Germain and the descendant of the Racoczis are one and the same is firmly held by many people, who regard him as a genuine adept and even think he may still be living.

The Comte de Saint-Germain was a man “of middle height, strongly built, and dressed with superb simplicity.” He spoke with an entire lack of ceremony to the most highly placed personages and was fully conscious of his superiority. Said Gleichen of the first time he met Saint-Germain: “He threw down his hat and sword, sat down in an armchair near the fire and interrupted the conversation by saying to the man who was speaking: ‘You do not know what you are saying! I am the only person who is competent to speak on this subject, and I have exhausted it. It was the same with music, which I gave up when I found I had no more to learn.'”

Indeed, many people who heard him play the violin said of him that he equaled or even surpassed the greatest virtuosos of the period, and he seems to have justified his remark that he had reached the extreme limit possible in the art of music.

Saint-Germain was also an accomplished artist. One day he took Gleichen to his house and said to him: “I am pleased with you, and you have earned my showing you a few paintings of mine.” “And he very effectively kept his word,” said Gleichen, “for the paintings he showed me all bore a stamp of singularity or perfection which made them more interesting than many works of art of the highest order.”

However, he seems not to have excelled as a poet. There survive of his an indifferent sonnet and a letter addressed to Marie Antoinette (quoted by the Comtesse d’Adhemar) that contains predictions in doggerel verse. At the request of Madam de Pompadour he also wrote a rather poor outline of a comedy.

The Alchemist

By far the greatest obvious talents of the Comte de Saint-Germain were connected with his knowledge of alchemy. Yet if Saint-Germain he knew how to make gold, he was wise enough to say nothing about it. Nothing but the possession of this secret could perhaps account for the enormous wealth at his command, though he was not known to have money on deposit at any banker’s. What he does seem to have admitted, at least ambiguously, is that he could make a big diamond out of several small stones. The diamonds that he wore in his shoes and garters were believed to be worth more than 200,000 francs. He asserted also that he could increase the size of pearls at will, and some of the pearls in his possession certainly were of astonishing size.

If all that he said on this subject was mere bragging, it was expensive, for he supported it by magnificent gifts. Madam du Hausset tells us that one day when he was showing the queen some jewels in her presence, she commented on the beauty of a cross of white and green stones. Saint-Germain nonchalantly made her a present of it. Madam du Hausset refused, but the queen, thinking the stones were false, signed to her that she might accept. Madam du Hausset subsequently had the stones valued, and they turned out to be genuine and extremely valuable.

His amazing youthfulness

But the feature in Saint-Germain’s personage that is hardest to believe is his astounding longevity. The musician Rameau and Madam de Gergy (with the latter of whom, according to the memoirs of Casanova, he was still dining about 1775) both assert that they met him at Venice in 1710, under the name of the Marquis de Montferrat. Both of them agree that he then had the appearance of a man of between forty and fifty years old. If their recollection is accurate this evidence destroys the hypotheses according to which Saint-Germain was the son of Marie de Neubourg or the son of Francis Racoczi II, for if he had been, he would not have been more than about twenty in 1710. Later, Madam de Gergy told Madam de Pompadour that she had received from Saint-Germain at Venice an elixir that enabled her to preserve, for a long time and without the smallest change, the appearance of a woman of twenty-five. A gift as precious as this could not be forgotten! It is also true, however, that Saint-Germain, when questioned by Madam de Pompadour on the subject of his meeting with Madam de Gergy fifty years earlier and of the marvelous elixir he was supposed to have given to her, replied with a smile: “It is not impossible; but I confess it is likely that this lady, for whom I have the greatest respect, is talking nonsense.”

We can compare with this the offer he made to Mademoiselle de Genlis when she was a child: “When you are seventeen or eighteen will you be happy to remain at that age, at least for a great many years?” She answered that she should indeed be charmed. “Very well,” he said very gravely; “I promise you that you shall.” And he at once spoke of something else.

The period of his great celebrity in Paris extended from 1750 to 1760. Everyone agreed then that, in appearance, he was a man of between forty and fifty. He disappeared for fifteen years, and when the Comtesse d’Adhemar saw him again in 1775, she declared that she found him younger than ever. And when she saw him again twelve years later he still looked the same. While he deliberately allowed his hearers to believe that his life had lasted inconceivably long, he never actually said so. He proceeded by veiled allusions.

“He diluted the strength of the marvelous in his stories,” said his friend Gleichen, “according to the receptivity of his hearer. When he was telling a fool some event of the time of Charles V, he informed him quite crudely that he had been present. But when he spoke to somebody less credulous, he contented himself with describing the smallest circumstances, the faces and gestures of the speakers, the room and the part of it they were in, with such vivacity and in such detail that his hearers received the impression that he had actually been present at the scene. ‘These fools of Parisians,’ he said to me one day, ‘believe that I am five hundred years old. I confirm them in this idea because I see that it gives them much pleasure – not that I am not infinitely older than I appear.'”

Tradition has related that he said he had known Jesus and been present at the Council of Nicea. But he did not go so far as this in his contempt for the men with whom he associated and in his derision of their credulity. This tradition originates from the fact that Lord Gower, who was a practical joker, gave imitations at his house of well-known men of his time. When he came to Saint-Germain, he imitated his manner and voice in an imaginary conversation that Saint-Germain was supposed to have had with the founder of Christianity, of whom Lord Gower made him say: “He was the best man imaginable, but romantic and thoughtless.”

About 1760, an English newspaper, the London Mercury, quite seriously published the following story: “The Comte de Saint-Germain presented a lady of his acquaintance, who was concerned at growing old, with a vial of his famous elixir of long life. The lady put the vial into a drawer. One of her servants, a middle-aged woman, thought the vial contained a harmless purge and drank the contents. When the lady summoned her servant next day, there appeared before her a young girl, almost a child. It was the effect of the elixir. A few drops more and I have no doubt the servant would have answered her mistress with infantile screams!”

“Has anyone ever seen me eat or drink?” said Saint-Germain, as he was passing through Vienna, to a Herr Graeffer who offered him some Tokay. Everyone who knew him agreed in saying that though he liked sitting down to table with a numerous company, he never touched the dishes. He was fond of offering his intimate friends the recipe of a purge made of senna pods. His principal food, which he prepared himself, was a mixture of oatmeal.

But is it really so surprising that the authors of memoirs depict Saint-Germain as retaining the same physical appearance during a whole century? Human life may have a duration infinitely longer than that ordinarily attributed to it. It is the activity of our nerves, the flame of our desire, the acid of our fears, which daily consume our organism. He who succeeds in raising himself above his emotions, in suppressing in himself anger and the fear of illness, is capable of overcoming the attrition of the years and attaining an age at least double that at which men now die of old age. If the face of a man who is not tormented by his emotions should retain its youth, it would be no miracle. Not long ago a London medical periodical reported the case of a woman who at seventy-four had preserved “the features and expression of a girl of twenty, without a wrinkle or a white hair. She had become insane as the result of an unhappy love affair, and her insanity consisted in the perpetual reliving of her last separation from her lover.” From her conviction that she was young she had remained young. It may be that a subjective conception of time, and the suppression of impatience and expectation, enable a highly developed man to reduce to a minimum the normal wear and tear of the body. The Comte de Saint-Germain asserted also that he had the capacity of stopping the mechanism of the human clock during sleep. He thus almost entirely stopped the physical wastage that proceeds, without our knowing it, from breathing and the beating of the heart.

His Careers

Saint-Germain’s activity and the diversity of his occupations were very great. He was interested in the preparation of dyes and even started a factory in Germany for the manufacture of felt hats. But his principal role was that of a secret agent in international politics in the service of France. He became Louis XV’s confidential and intimate counselor and was entrusted by him with various secret missions. This drew on him the enmity of many important men, including, notably, that of the Duke de Choiseul, the minister for foreign affairs. It was this enmity which compelled him to leave hurriedly for England in order to escape imprisonment in the Bastille.

Louis XV did not agree with his minister’s policy with regard to Austria and tried to negotiate peace behind his back by using Holland as an intermediary. Saint-Germain was sent to The Hague to negotiate there with Prince Louis of Brunswick. Monsieur d’Affry, the French minister in Holland, was informed of this step, and complained bitterly to his minister for foreign affairs that France was carrying on negotiations that did not pass through his hands. The Duke de Choiseul seized his opportunity. He sent d’Affry orders demanding the extradition of Saint-Germain and have him arrested by the Dutch Government and sent to Paris. This decision was communicated to the king in the presence of his ministers in council, and Louis, not daring to admit his participation in the affair, blamed it all on his emissary. But Saint-Germain received warning just before his arrest. He had time to escape and take ship for England. The adventurer Casanova gives us some details of this escape; he happened to be in a hotel near that in which Saint-Germain was staying, and found himself mixed up in a complicated story of jewels, swindlers, duped fathers and girls madly in love with him — a story, in fact, that was typical of the ordinary course of Saint-Germain’s life.

According to Horace Walpole’s letters, Saint-Germain had been arrested in London some years previously on account of his mysterious life. He had been set free because there was nothing against him. Walpole, a true Englishman, came to the conclusion that “he was not a gentleman” because he used to say with a laugh that he was taken for a spy. He was not arrested a second time in England. Not long after this, he was found in Russia, where he was to play an important but hidden part in the revolution of 1762. Count Alexis Orloff met him some years later in Italy and said of him: “Here is a man who played an important part in our revolution.” Alexis’ brother, Gregory Orloff, handed over to Saint-Germain of his own free will 20,000 sequins, an uncommon action, seeing that Saint-Germain had not rendered him any particular service. At that time he wore the uniform of a Russian general and called himself Soltikov.

His Prophecies

It was about this period, the beginning of the reign of Louis XVI, that Saint-Germain returned to France and saw Marie Antoinette. The Comtesse d’Adhemar has left a detailed account of the interview. It was to her that he turned to obtain access to the queen. Since his flight to England, he had not reappeared in France, but the memory of him had become a legend, and Louis XV’s friendship for him was well known. It was easy, therefore, for the Comtesse d’Adhemar to arrange a meeting with Marie Antoinette, who immediately asked Saint-Germain if he was going to settle in Paris again. “A century will pass,” was his reply, “before I come here again.”

In the presence of the queen he spoke in a grave voice and foretold events that would take place fifteen years later. “The queen in her wisdom will weigh that which I am about to tell her in confidence. The Encyclopedist party desires power, which it will obtain only by the complete fall of the clergy. In order to bring about this result, it will upset the monarchy. The Encyclopedists, who are seeking a chief among the members of the royal family, have cast their eyes on the Duke de Chartres. The duke will become the instrument of men who will sacrifice him when he has ceased to be useful to them. He will come to the scaffold instead of to the throne. Not for long will the laws remain the protection of the good and the terror of the wicked. The wicked will seize power with bloodstained hands. They will do away with the Catholic religion, the nobility, and the magistracy.”

“So that only royalty will be left,” the queen interrupted impatiently.

“Not even royalty. There will be a bloodthirsty republic, whose scepter will be the executioner’s knife.”

It is quite plain from these words that Saint-Germain’s ideas were entirely different from those ascribed to him by the majority of historical authors of this period, nearly all of whom see in him an active instrument of the revolutionary movement. His terrible and amazing predictions filled Marie Antoinette with foreboding and agitation. Saint-Germain asked to see the King, in order to make even more serious revelations, but he asked to see him without his minister, Maurepas, being told of it.

“He is my enemy,” he said, “and I count him among those who will contribute to the ruin of the kingdom, not from malice but from incapacity.”

The king did not possess sufficient authority to have an interview with anybody without the presence of his minister. He informed Maurepas of the interview that Saint-Germain had had with the queen, and Maurepas thought it would be wisest to imprison in the Bastille a man who had so gloomy a vision of the future.

Out of courtesy to the Comtesse d’Adhemar, Maurepas visited her in order to acquaint her with this decision. She received him in her room.

“I know the scoundrel better than you do,” he said. “He will be exposed. Our police officials have a very keen scent. Only one thing surprises me. The years have not spared me, whereas the queen declares that the Comte de Saint-Germain looks like a man of forty.”

At this moment the attention of both of them was distracted by the sound of a door being shut. The comtesse uttered a cry. The expression on Maurepas’ face changed. Saint-Germain stood before them.

“The king has called on you to give him good counsel,” he said; “and in refusing to allow me to see him you think only of maintaining your authority. You are destroying the monarchy, for I have only a limited time to give to France, and when that time has passed I shall be seen again only after three generations. I shall not be to blame when anarchy with all its horrors devastates France. You will not see these calamities, but the fact that you paved the way for them will be enough to blacken your memory.”

Having uttered this in one breath, he walked to the door, shut it behind him and disappeared. All efforts to find him proved useless. The keen scent of Maurepas’ police officials was not keen enough, either during the days immediately following or later. They never discovered what had happened to the Comte de Saint-Germain.

As had been foretold to him, Maurepas did not see the calamities for which he had helped to pave the way. He died in 1781. In 1784 a rumor was current in Paris that the Comte de Saint-Germain had just died in the Duchy of Schleswig, at the castle of the Count Charles of Hesse Cassel. For biographers and historians this date seems likely to remain the official date of his death. From that day forward, the mystery in which the Comte de Saint-Germain was shrouded grew deeper than ever.

His “Death”

Secluded at Eckenforn in the count’s castle, Saint-Germain announced that he was tired of fife. He seemed careworn and melancholy. He said he felt feeble, but he refused to see a doctor and was tended only by women. No details exist of his death, or rather of his supposed death. No tombstone at Eckenforn bore his name. It was known that he had left all his papers and certain documents relating to Freemasonry to the Count of Hesse Cassel. The count for his part asserted that he had lost a very dear friend. But his attitude was highly equivocal. He refused to give any information about his friend or his last moments, and turned the conversation if anyone spoke of him. His whole behavior gives color to the supposition that he was the accomplice of a pretended death.

Although, on the evidence of reliable witnesses, he must have been at least a hundred years old in 1784, his death in that year cannot have been genuine. The official documents of Freemasonry say that in 1785 the French masons chose him as their representative at the great convention that took place in that year, with Mesmer, Saint-Martin, and Cagliostro present. In the following year Saint-Germain was received by the Empress of Russia. Finally, the Comtesse d’Adhemar reports at great length a conversation she had with him in 1789 in the Church of the Recollets, after the taking of the Bastille.

His face looked no older than it had looked thirty years earlier. He said he had come from China and Japan. “There is nothing so strange out there,” he said, “as that which is happening here. But I can do nothing. My hands are tied by someone who is stronger than I. There are times when it is possible to draw back; others at which the decree must be carried out as soon as he has pronounced it.”

And he told her in broad outlines all the events, not excepting the death of the queen, that were to take place in the years that followed. “The French will play with titles and honors and ribbons like children. They will regard everything as a plaything, even the equipment of the Garde Nationale. There is today a deficit of some forty millions, which is the nominal cause of the Revolution. Well, under the dictatorship of philanthropists and orators the national debt will reach thousands of millions.”

“I have seen Saint-Germain again,” wrote Comtesse d’Adhemar in 1821, “each time to my amazement. I saw him when the queen was murdered, on the 18th of Brumaire, on the day following the death of the Duke d’Enghien, in January, 1815, and on the eve of the murder of the Duke de Berry.”

Mademoiselle de Genlis asserts that she met the Comte de Saint-Germain in 1821 during the negotiations for the Treaty of Vienna; and the Comte de Chalons, who was ambassador in Venice, said he spoke to him there soon afterwards in the Piazza di San Marco. There is other evidence, though less conclusive, of his survival. The Englishman Grosley said he saw him in 1798 in a revolutionary prison; and someone else wrote that he was one of the crowd surrounding the tribunal at which the Princess de Lamballe appeared before her execution.

It seems quite certain that the Comte de Saint-Germain did not die at the place and on the date that history has fixed. He continued an unknown career, of whose end we are ignorant and whose duration seems so long that one’s imagination hesitates to admit it.

Secret Societies

Many writers who have studied the French Revolution do not believe in the influence exerted by the Comte de Saint-Germain. It is true that he set up no landmarks for posterity, and even obliterated the traces he had made. He left no arrogant memorial of himself such as a book. He worked for humanity, not for himself. He was modest, the rarest quality in men of intelligence. His only foibles were the harmless affectation of appearing a great deal younger than his age and the pleasure he took in making a ring sparkle. But men are judged only by their own statements and by the merits they attribute to themselves. Only his age and his jewels attracted notice.

Yet the part he played in the spiritual sphere was considerable. He was the architect who drew the plans for a work that is as yet only on the stocks. But he was an architect betrayed by the workmen. He had dreamed of a high tower that should enable man to communicate with heaven, and the workmen preferred to build houses for eating and sleeping.

He influenced Freemasonry and the secret societies, though many modem masons have denied this and have even omitted to mention him as a great source of inspiration. In Vienna he took part in the foundation of the Society of Asiatic Brothers and of the Knights of Light, who studied alchemy; and it was he who gave Mesmer his fundamental ideas on personal magnetism and hypnotism. It is said that he initiated Cagliostro, who visited him on several occasions in Holstein to receive directions from him, though there is no direct evidence for this. The two men were to be far separated from one another by opposite currents and a different fate.

The Comtesse d’Adhemar quotes a letter she received from Saint-Germain in which he says, speaking of his journey to Paris in 1789, “I wished to see the work that that demon of hell, Cagliostro, has prepared.” It seems that Cagliostro took part in the preparation of the revolutionary movement, which Saint-Germain tried to check by developing mystical ideas among the most advanced men of the period. He had foreseen the chaos of the last years of the eighteenth century and hoped to give it a turn in the direction of peace by spreading among its future promoters a philosophy that might change them. But he reckoned without the slowness with which the soul of man develops and without the aversion that man brings to the task. And he left out of his calculations the powerful reactions of hatred.

All over the country secret societies sprang up. The new spirit manifested itself in the form of associations. Neither the nobility nor the clergy escaped what had become a fashion. There were even formed lodges for women, and the Princesse de Lamballe became grand mistress of one of them. In Germany there were the Illuminati and the Knights of Strict Observance, and Frederick II, when he came to the throne, founded the sect of the Architects of Africa. In France, the Order of the Templars was reconstituted, and Freemasonry, whose grand master was the Duke de Chartres, increased the number of its lodges in every town. Martinez de Pasqually taught his philosophy at Marseilles, Bordeaux and Toulouse; and Savalette de Lange, with mystics such as Court de Gebelin and Saint-Martin, founded the lodge of the Friends Assembled.

The initiates of these sects understood that they were the depositories of a heritage that they did not know, but whose boundless value they guessed; it was to be found somewhere, perhaps in traditions, perhaps in a book written by a master, perhaps in themselves. They spoke of this revealing word, this hidden treasure it was said to be in the hands of “unknown superiors of these sects, who would one day disclose the wealth which gives freedom and immortality.”

It was this immortality of the spirit that Saint-Germain tried to bring to a small group of chosen initiates. He believed that this minority, once it was developed itself, would, in its turn, help to develop another small number, and that a vast spiritual radiation would gradually descend, in beneficent waves, towards the more ignorant masses. It was a sage’s dream, which was never to be realized.

Saint-Germain’s Philosophy

With the co-operation of Savalette de Lange, who was the nominal head, he founded the group of Philalethes, or truth-lovers, which was recruited from the cream of the Friends Assembled. The Prince of Hesse, Condorcet, and Cagliostro were all members of this group. Saint-Germain expounded his philosophy at Ermenonville and in Paris, in the rue Platriere. It was a Platonic Christianity, which combined Swedenborg’s visions with Martinez de Pasqually’s theory of reintegration. There were to be found in it Plotinus’ emanations and the hierarchy of successive planes described by Hermeticists and modem theosophists. He taught that man has in him infinite possibilities and that, from the practical point of view, he must strive unceasingly to free himself of matter in order to enter into communication with the world of higher intelligences.

He was understood by some. In two great successive assemblies, at which every Masonic lodge in France was represented, the Philalethes attempted the reform of Freemasonry. If they had attained their aim, if they had succeeded in directing the great force of Freemasonry by the prestige of their philosophy, which was sublime and disinterested, it may be that the course of events would have been altered, that the old dream of a world guided by philosopher-initiates would have been realized.

But matters were to turn out differently. Old causes, created by accumulated injustices had paved the way for terrible effects. These effects were in their turn to create the causes of future evil. The chain of evil, linked firmly together by men’s egoism and hatred, was not to be broken. The light kindled by a few wise visionaries, a few faithful watchers over the well being of their brothers, was extinguished almost as soon as it was kindled.

Legend of the Eternal Master

Napoleon III, puzzled and interested by what he had heard about the mysterious life of the Comte de Saint-Germain, instructed one of his librarians to search for and collect all that could be found about him in archives and documents of the latter part of the eighteenth century. This was done, and a great number of papers, forming an enormous dossier, was deposited in the library of the prefecture of police. Unfortunately, the Franco-Prussian War and the Commune supervened, and the part of the building in which the dossier was kept was burnt. Thus once again a synchronous accident upheld the ancient law that decrees that the life of the adept must always be surrounded with mystery.

What happened to the Comte de Saint-Germain after 1821, in which year there is evidence that he was still alive? An Englishman, Albert Vandam, in his memoirs, which he calls An Englishman in Paris, speaks of a certain person whom he knew towards the end of Louis Philippe’s reign and whose way of life bore a curious resemblance to that of the Comte de Saint-Germain. “He called himself Major Fraser,” wrote Vandam, “He lived alone and never alluded to his family. Moreover he was lavish with money, though the source of his fortune remained a mystery to everyone. He possessed a marvelous knowledge of all the countries in Europe at all periods. His memory was absolutely incredible and, curiously enough, he often gave his hearers to understand that he had acquired his learning elsewhere than from books. Many is the time he has told me, with a strange smile, that he was certain he had known Nero, had spoken with Dante, and so on.”

Like Saint-Germain, Major Fraser had the appearance of a man of between forty and fifty, of middle height and strongly built. The rumor was current that he was the illegitimate son of a Spanish prince. After having been, also like Saint-Germain, a cause of astonishment to Parisian society for a considerable time, he disappeared without leaving a trace. Was it the same Major Fraser who, in 1820, published an account of his journey in the Himalayas, in which he said he had reached Gangotri, the source of the most sacred branch of the Ganges River, and bathed in the source of the Jumna River?

It was at the end of the nineteenth century that the legend of Saint-Germain grew so inordinately. By reason of his knowledge, of the integrity of his life, of his wealth and of the mystery that surrounded him, he might reasonably have been taken for an heir of the first Rosicrucians, for a possessor of the Philosopher’s Stone. But the theosophists and a great many occultists regarded him as a master of the great White Lodge of the Himalayas. The legend of these masters is well known. According to it there live in inaccessible lamaseries in Tibet certain wise men who possess the ancient secrets of the lost civilization of Atlantis. Sometimes they send to their imperfect brothers, who are blinded by passions and ignorance, sublime messengers to teach and guide them. Krishna, the Buddha, and Jesus were the greatest of these. But there were many other more obscure messengers, of whom Saint-Germain has been considered to be one.

“This pupil of Hindu and Egyptian hierophants, this holder of the secret knowledge of the East,” theosophist Madam Blavatsky says of him, “was not appreciated for who he was. The stupid world has always treated in this way men who, like Saint-Germain, have returned to it after long years of seclusion devoted to study with their hands full of the treasure of esoteric wisdom and with the hope of making the world better, wiser and happier.” Between 1880 and 1900 it was admitted among all theosophists, who at that time had become very numerous, particularly in England and America, that the Comte de Saint-Germain was still alive, that he was still engaged in the spiritual development of the West, and that those who sincerely took part in this development had the possibility of meeting him.

The brotherhood of Khe-lan was famous throughout Tibet, and one of their most famous brothers was an Englishman who had arrived one day during the early part of the twentieth century from the West. He spoke every language, including the Tibetan, and knew every art and science, says the tradition. His sanctity and the phenomena produced by him caused him to be proclaimed a Shaberon Master after a residence of but a few years. His memory lives to the present day among the Tibetans, but his real name is a secret with the Shaberons alone. Might not this mysterious traveler be the Comte de Saint-Germain?

But even if he has never come back, even if he is no longer alive and we must relegate to legend the idea that the great Hermetic nobleman is still wandering about the world with his sparkling jewels, his senna tea, and his taste for princesses and queens even so it can be said that he has gained the immortality he sought. For a great number of imaginative and sincere men the Comte de Saint-Germain is more alive than he has ever been. There are men who, when they hear a step on the staircase, think it may perhaps be he, coming to give them advice, to bring them some unexpected philosophical idea. They do not jump up to open the door to their guest, for material barriers do not exist for him. There are men who, when they go to sleep, are pervaded by genuine happiness because they are certain that their spirit, when freed from the body, will be able to hold converse with the master in the luminous haze of the astral world.

The Comte de Saint-Germain is always present with us. There will always be, as there were in the eighteenth century, mysterious doctors, enigmatic travelers, bringers of occult secrets, to perpetuate him. Some will have bathed in the sources of the Ganges, and others will show a talisman found in the pyramids. But they are not necessary. They diminish the range of the mystery by giving it everyday, material form. The Comte de Saint-Germain is immortal, as he always dreamed of being.

 

 

Embodied as:

Ruler of a Golden Age civilization in the area of the Sahara Desert 70,000 years ago

High priest on Atlantis approximately 13,000 years ago, serving in the Order of Lord Zadkiel in the Temple of Purification, located where the island of Cuba now is

Prophet Samuel, 11th century B.C. Religious leader in Israel who served as prophet, priest, and last of the Hebrew judges

Plato, 427 – 347 B.C., Greece. He studied with students of Pythagoras in Crotona and scholars in Egypt. He established his own school of philosophy at the Academy in Athens.

Saint Joseph, 1st century A.D., Nazareth. Husband of Mary and Guardian of Jesus

Saint Alban, late 3rd or early 4th century A.D., town of Verulamium, renamed St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. He was the first martyr in England. He had sheltered a fugitive priest, became a devout convert to Christianity, and was put to death for disguising himself as the priest so he could die in his place.

Hesiod, circa 700 B.C., Greece. Poet whose writings serve as a major source for knowledge of Greek mythology and cosmology

Proclus, circa 410 – 485 A.D., Greece. The last major Greek Neoplatonic philosopher, who headed the Platonic Academy in Athens and wrote extensively on philosophy, astronomy, mathematics, and grammar

Merlin, circa 5th or 6th century A.D., England. Magician and counselor at King Arthur’s Camelot who inspired the establishment of the Order of the Knights of the Round Table

Roger Bacon, circa 1220 – 1292 A.D., England. Philosopher, educational reformer, and experimental scientist; forerunner of modern science renowned for his exhaustive investigations into alchemy, optics, mathematics, and languages

Organizer behind the scenes for the Secret Societies in Germany in the late 14th and early 15th centuries A.D. The creation of a fictional character named “Christian Rosenkreuz” was apparently inspired by his efforts.

Christopher Columbus, 1451 – 1506 A.D. Believed to have been born in Genoa, Italy and settled in Portugal. Discovered America in 1492 during first of four voyages to the New World sponsored by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain

Francis Bacon, 1561 – 1626 A.D., England. Philosopher, statesman, essayist and literary master, author of the Shakespearean plays, father of inductive science and herald of the scientific revolution. Sir Francis Bacon made it appear that he died on Easter Sunday 1626, and he even attended his own “funeral” in disguise. He traveled secretly to Transylvania (now part of Romania) to the Rakoczy Mansion, where he continued preparations for his physical Ascension under the direct training of the Master R (Great Divine Director). He had incarnated in that area a number of times in previous lifetimes and felt particularly at home there. Since Francis Bacon was sighted in the area at various times over the following decades, some local people speculated that he might be a member of the Rakoczy family (possibly related to Prince Ferenc Rakoczy II of Transylvania). Finally on May 1, 1684 he attained his physical Ascension. Not wanting to leave humanity in the physical octave without his direct visible assistance, he asked the Karmic Board for a special Dispensation to allow him to function in a physical tangible body among embodied mankind for a limited time period – even though he was already an Ascended Master. He was granted his request at the direct intercession of the Goddess of Liberty, and reappeared as:

Le Comte de Saint Germain, the “Wonderman of Europe” in the 18th and 19th centuries A.D. He developed a reputation of being an outstanding alchemist, scholar, linguist, musician, artist and diplomat. He worked behind the scenes to try to establish a United States of Europe and to prevent the bloodshed of violent revolution. His powers included bilocation, appearing at court and then dissolving his form at will, removing flaws from diamonds and other precious stones, and precipitating an elixir that prevented aging. He was also ambidextrous and could compose simultaneously a letter with one hand and poetry with the other, or two identical pieces of writing with each hand. He visited Marie Antoinette and her intimate friend, Madame d’Adhémar, who later wrote the story of his abilities as an Adept, and that he had warned of the coming debacle and death of the king and queen. He also worked behind the scenes with George Washington and Benjamin Franklin to establish the United States of America.

Ascended Master Saint Germain is now known as “The God of Freedom” for the Earth and, since May 1, 1954, the Hierarch for the “Dawning Golden Age” in this current Aquarian Age cycle. The name “Saint Germain” is the name that Francis Bacon chose as his Ascended Master name upon his physical Ascension from the Rakoczy (Rákóczi) Mansion in Transylvania. It comes from the Latin Sanctus Germanus, meaning  “Holy Brother “.

Ascended:

May 1, 1684, from the Rákóczi Mansion in the Carpathian Mountain region of Transylvania (now part of Romania)

First Public Dictation / Discourse:

June 13, 1932   Chicago, Illinois U.S.A. 2 

Retreats:

Cave of Symbols, Table Mountain, near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, U.S.A 

Beloved Saint Germain also uses:

The Retreat of The Great Divine Director: The Rakoczy Mansion in Transylvania, Romania (This Retreat is the Focus of Freedom for Europe. On the etheric plane, there has been established there a Sacred Temple of the Maltese Cross)

The Royal Teton Retreat at the Grand Teton, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, U.S.A.

The Cave of Light in India

Divine Quality:

Freedom

Mercy

Forgiveness

Ceremony / Sacred Ritual

Justice

Alchemy

Vibration / Flame / Ray:

Violet Flame, Violet Ray

Purple Flame, Purple Ray

Angels:

Angels of the Violet Flame

Angels of the Violet Ray

Angels of Freedom

Angels of the Maltese Cross

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Written by aurick

27/02/2009 at 1:46 pm

One Response

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  1. Sorry, none of this rings true for me. What’s it doing on this excellent website?

    Reen

    25/01/2012 at 6:31 pm


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